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Goal: 45,000 Progress: 11,455
Sponsored by: The Veterans Site

In 2014, the VA announced the U.S. Veteran Service Dog Program which was intended to allow U.S. veterans with certified service dogs unlimited access to veterinary care.

Many veterans' groups initially cheered, but under greater scrutiny, the Program was revealed to be an incomplete, halfhearted measure.

Why? Because it doesn't cover service dogs for psychiatric conditions, including PTSD.

The VA's U.S. Veteran Service Dog Program covers the cost of service dogs only in cases of physical disability. Dogs for mobility, hearing, or sight are covered, but psychiatric issues like PTSD are not. The VA claims that there is not enough evidence to show that the dogs were efficacious despite countless studies to the contrary.

Countless studies disagree with the VA. The Use of Psychiatric Service Dogs in the Treatment of Veterans with PTSD, a study conducted by Craig Love Ph.D. in 2009 found that 82% of those with a PTSD diagnosis reported symptom reduction after partnership with a service dog, and another 40% reported that their use of medication decreased. Other studies have found PTSD service dogs can lessen a veteran's perception of physical pain, decrease agitation and aggression, increase social interaction and ability to manage daily living, lower blood pressure and heart rate, decrease loneliness, and ease anxiety or depression.

Clearly, service dogs for PTSD can be part of an effective treatment which improves the quality of veterans' lives, which is why the VA MUST cover the cost of service dogs for psychiatric conditions.

Not all wounds are visible. Tell the VA to change the U.S. Veteran Service Dog Program to cover service dogs for any troop that needs one!

Sign Here






To the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs,

I am writing as a concerned citizen to you on behalf of the thousands of veterans who find they are suffering from PTSD. I hope we can both agree that it is vital for the country to do all it can to assist struggling vets.

In 2014, the VA announced the U.S. Veteran Service Dog Program which was intended to allow U.S. veterans with certified service dogs unlimited access to veterinary care. Many veterans' groups cheered, but under greater scrutiny, the Program was revealed to be an incomplete, halfhearted measure.

Why? Because it doesn't cover service dogs for psychiatric conditions, including PTSD.

The VA claims that there is not enough evidence to show that the dogs were efficacious despite countless studies to the contrary.

Countless studies disagree with the VA. The Use of Psychiatric Service Dogs in the Treatment of Veterans with PTSD, a study conducted by Craig Love Ph.D. in 2009 found that 82% of those with a PTSD diagnosis reported symptom reduction after partnership with a service dog, and another 40% reported that their use of medication decreased. Other studies have found PTSD service dogs can lessen a veteran's perception of physical pain, decrease agitation and aggression, increase social interaction and ability to manage daily living, lower blood pressure and heart rate, decrease loneliness, and ease anxiety or depression.

Clearly, service dogs for PTSD can be part of an effective treatment which improves the quality of veterans' lives, which is why the VA MUST cover the cost of service dogs for psychiatric conditions.

Not all wounds are visible. Please, help our veterans cope with PTSD by covering their costs for service dogs. The studies that prove their effectiveness are there. The lives of thousands of veterans in need of help depend on you.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Jan 17, 2017 Amanda Kvapil
Jan 17, 2017 Vivian Lombardozzi
Jan 17, 2017 Cindy-Lou Joyce
Jan 16, 2017 Michelle Howe
Jan 16, 2017 Erin Vachon
Jan 15, 2017 Jessie Bourke
Jan 15, 2017 Merina Halingten
Jan 15, 2017 Mary O'Maley
Jan 14, 2017 Linda Dodson
Jan 14, 2017 Dewey Jackson
Jan 14, 2017 Elaine Heathcoat
Jan 14, 2017 Sue Jackson
Jan 14, 2017 Betsy Farmer
Jan 14, 2017 Susan Armistead, M.D.
Jan 14, 2017 Emmy Daskalaki
Jan 13, 2017 carla howard
Jan 12, 2017 Diana Wallace
Jan 12, 2017 Malgorzata Picinska
Jan 12, 2017 Allison Penny
Jan 11, 2017 Sondra McMurray Dogs are so loving and loyal! We love them like family. A dog's companionship makes people happier and healthier! Our vets deserve this!
Jan 11, 2017 DIANE SEYMOUR THEY HELPED YOU,NOW IT'S YOUR TURN TO HELP THEM!
Jan 11, 2017 Maija Johansson
Jan 11, 2017 Riitta Salokannel
Jan 10, 2017 Bill Coburn
Jan 10, 2017 Beri Hurtado
Jan 10, 2017 Joan Delauro
Jan 10, 2017 Alice Jacobson
Jan 10, 2017 Linda Pledger
Jan 10, 2017 Ana Nieto
Jan 10, 2017 (Name not displayed) As a former Vietnam combat Veteran, 66 to 68 now a retired Vet Center Team Leader, I have seen the value of Veteran service animals to reduce the symptoms of PTSD. VA please cover service dogs.
Jan 10, 2017 Alexandra Machado
Jan 10, 2017 Cindy Martin
Jan 10, 2017 Sandra Wong Our veterans need help to cope with their trauma
Jan 10, 2017 Craig Barthuly
Jan 10, 2017 Aleasa Crary
Jan 10, 2017 Vicki Keehner
Jan 10, 2017 Tammy Boykin
Jan 10, 2017 JILL MORRA
Jan 10, 2017 Greg Huffman
Jan 10, 2017 Ronald Johnson
Jan 10, 2017 Katherine Bommarito
Jan 10, 2017 Sue Ellen Lupien
Jan 10, 2017 Sue Wagner
Jan 10, 2017 Patsey Manning
Jan 10, 2017 Linda Harling
Jan 10, 2017 Aurora Fuentes
Jan 9, 2017 sara elkins
Jan 9, 2017 Amanda Ellixson
Jan 9, 2017 Mallory McNicoll
Jan 9, 2017 Rachelle Giles

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