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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 332
Sponsored by: The Veterans Site

Between 50 and 70 million working Americans suffer from sleep or wakefulness disorder, and it's hurting us all.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has linked those drowsy millions to occupational disasters, higher susceptibility to chronic disease, and motor vehicle accidents--liabilities well beyond a lack of productivity.

A study by the RAND Corporation found that the United States can attribute up to $411 billion in economic losses each year to workers who aren't getting enough sleep. That amounts to a record of 1.23 million working days a year.

The U.S. is sadly a global leader in this area, along with Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Canada. Sleeplessness, whether it's caused by overwork, overstimulation, or associated health issues like sleep apnea, is a detriment to our health.

We demand the country's employers recognize the right of its workers to be healthy, and that includes the right to sleep.

There's no doubt that proper rest contributes to better decision-making, a healthier workforce, and higher productivity. In fact, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that reduced hours for workers in an intensive care unit, allowing for more sleep between shifts, led to significantly reduced critical errors. The medical staff studied made 35 percent more serious medical errors when working the longer schedule, with shifts up to 24 hours or more.

In France, the significance of a well-rested workforce has been indicated by law. Weekend emails from French employers were deemed illegal in May 2016.

“The development of information and communication technologies, if badly managed or regulated, can have an impact on the health of workers,” Article 25 of the El Khomri law states. “Among them, the burden of work and the informational overburden, the blurring of the borders between private life and professional life, are risks associated with the usage of digital technology.”

In the U.S., Aetna has incentivized sleep for its workers. CNBC reported that Chairman and CEO Merk Bertolini will pay any employee $25 a night, for up to $500 a year, to any worker that can sleep for seven or more hours in a row. This innovative program has been tested, and it works, Bertolini says, as proven by a more alert workforce, and higher productivity.

Examples like Aetna in the U.S. are few and far between, however. The rest of the country has a lot of catching up to do, and precedent needs to be set at the federal level.

Sign below to ask the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor to utilize this knowledge, to make sleep a priority and enact new standards that aim to benefit employer and employee alike.

Sign Here






To the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor,

Between 50 and 70 million working Americans suffer from sleep or wakefulness disorder, and it's hurting us all.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has linked those drowsy millions to occupational disasters, higher susceptibility to chronic disease, and motor vehicle accidents--liabilities well beyond a lack of productivity.

A study by the RAND Corporation found that the United States can attribute up to $411 billion in economic losses each year to workers who aren't getting enough sleep. That amounts to a record of 1.23 million working days a year.

The U.S. is sadly a global leader in this area, along with Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Canada. Sleeplessness, whether it's caused by overwork, overstimulation, or associated health issues like sleep apnea, is a detriment to our health.

I demand the country's employers recognize the right of its workers to be healthy, and that includes the right to sleep.

There's no doubt that proper rest contributes to better decision-making, a healthier workforce, and higher productivity. In fact, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that reduced hours for workers in an intensive care unit, allowing for more sleep between shifts, led to significantly reduced critical errors. The medical staff studied made 35 percent more serious medical errors when working the longer schedule, with shifts up to 24 hours or more.

In France, the significance of a well-rested workforce has been indicated by law. Weekend emails from French employers were deemed illegal in May 2016.

“The development of information and communication technologies, if badly managed or regulated, can have an impact on the health of workers,” Article 25 of the El Khomri law states. “Among them, the burden of work and the informational overburden, the blurring of the borders between private life and professional life, are risks associated with the usage of digital technology.”

In the U.S., Aetna has incentivized sleep for its workers. CNBC reported that Chairman and CEO Merk Bertolini will pay any employee $25 a night, for up to $500 a year, to any worker that can sleep for seven or more hours in a row. This innovative program has been tested, and it works, Bertolini says, as proven by a more alert workforce, and higher productivity.

Mr. Secretary, examples like Aetna are few and far between, however. The rest of the country has a lot of catching up to do, and precedent needs to be set at the federal level. I demand that you enact new standards that reflect this knowledge, that aim to benefit employer and employee alike by making sleep a priority.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Jun 27, 2017 Iryna Andreychuk
Jun 26, 2017 Carolien ten Brink
Jun 25, 2017 Kimberly Wiley
Jun 23, 2017 Crystal Conklin
Jun 22, 2017 Martha Wallace
Jun 22, 2017 Shashawna Foland
Jun 22, 2017 Deborah Clarke
Jun 22, 2017 Victoria Barajas
Jun 21, 2017 Caroline CEDELLE
Jun 21, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jun 21, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jun 21, 2017 Barbara Skinner
Jun 20, 2017 Dita Škalič
Jun 19, 2017 Ashleigh Heath
Jun 19, 2017 Jean Buchanan
Jun 19, 2017 Kathleen Serrano
Jun 18, 2017 Valerie Sanderson
Jun 18, 2017 Estella Edwards
Jun 18, 2017 Roxanne Asel
Jun 18, 2017 Jeanine Smegal
Jun 17, 2017 Brianna Onken
Jun 17, 2017 Elizabeth Cano
Jun 17, 2017 Shadoe Drury
Jun 17, 2017 Ellaine Janicki
Jun 17, 2017 Penny Gregorich
Jun 17, 2017 Andrew Green
Jun 16, 2017 Patricia Vazquez
Jun 16, 2017 Susan Closson
Jun 16, 2017 Lora Treadway
Jun 16, 2017 Magdalini M.
Jun 16, 2017 Heidi Parvela
Jun 15, 2017 Peter Kahigian
Jun 15, 2017 jane cook
Jun 15, 2017 natalie hughes
Jun 15, 2017 Kate Harder
Jun 15, 2017 Renata de Sa
Jun 15, 2017 Dana Barry
Jun 15, 2017 Deborah Spencer
Jun 15, 2017 Dorothy Brown
Jun 15, 2017 Lanelle Lovelace
Jun 15, 2017 Eric Dallin
Jun 15, 2017 Betty Reyes
Jun 15, 2017 Tammy Cieslak
Jun 15, 2017 nathalie guyonvarch
Jun 15, 2017 ibrahim rexhepi
Jun 15, 2017 Gemma Eggleton
Jun 15, 2017 Carol Bischoff
Jun 15, 2017 Y Winroope
Jun 15, 2017 Darcy Ralston
Jun 15, 2017 angela humphries

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