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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 408
Sponsored by: The Veterans Site

Between 50 and 70 million working Americans suffer from sleep or wakefulness disorder, and it's hurting us all.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has linked those drowsy millions to occupational disasters, higher susceptibility to chronic disease, and motor vehicle accidents--liabilities well beyond a lack of productivity.

A study by the RAND Corporation found that the United States can attribute up to $411 billion in economic losses each year to workers who aren't getting enough sleep. That amounts to a record of 1.23 million working days a year.

The U.S. is sadly a global leader in this area, along with Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Canada. Sleeplessness, whether it's caused by overwork, overstimulation, or associated health issues like sleep apnea, is a detriment to our health.

We demand the country's employers recognize the right of its workers to be healthy, and that includes the right to sleep.

There's no doubt that proper rest contributes to better decision-making, a healthier workforce, and higher productivity. In fact, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that reduced hours for workers in an intensive care unit, allowing for more sleep between shifts, led to significantly reduced critical errors. The medical staff studied made 35 percent more serious medical errors when working the longer schedule, with shifts up to 24 hours or more.

In France, the significance of a well-rested workforce has been indicated by law. Weekend emails from French employers were deemed illegal in May 2016.

“The development of information and communication technologies, if badly managed or regulated, can have an impact on the health of workers,” Article 25 of the El Khomri law states. “Among them, the burden of work and the informational overburden, the blurring of the borders between private life and professional life, are risks associated with the usage of digital technology.”

In the U.S., Aetna has incentivized sleep for its workers. CNBC reported that Chairman and CEO Merk Bertolini will pay any employee $25 a night, for up to $500 a year, to any worker that can sleep for seven or more hours in a row. This innovative program has been tested, and it works, Bertolini says, as proven by a more alert workforce, and higher productivity.

Examples like Aetna in the U.S. are few and far between, however. The rest of the country has a lot of catching up to do, and precedent needs to be set at the federal level.

Sign below to ask the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor to utilize this knowledge, to make sleep a priority and enact new standards that aim to benefit employer and employee alike.

Sign Here






To the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor,

Between 50 and 70 million working Americans suffer from sleep or wakefulness disorder, and it's hurting us all.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has linked those drowsy millions to occupational disasters, higher susceptibility to chronic disease, and motor vehicle accidents--liabilities well beyond a lack of productivity.

A study by the RAND Corporation found that the United States can attribute up to $411 billion in economic losses each year to workers who aren't getting enough sleep. That amounts to a record of 1.23 million working days a year.

The U.S. is sadly a global leader in this area, along with Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Canada. Sleeplessness, whether it's caused by overwork, overstimulation, or associated health issues like sleep apnea, is a detriment to our health.

I demand the country's employers recognize the right of its workers to be healthy, and that includes the right to sleep.

There's no doubt that proper rest contributes to better decision-making, a healthier workforce, and higher productivity. In fact, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that reduced hours for workers in an intensive care unit, allowing for more sleep between shifts, led to significantly reduced critical errors. The medical staff studied made 35 percent more serious medical errors when working the longer schedule, with shifts up to 24 hours or more.

In France, the significance of a well-rested workforce has been indicated by law. Weekend emails from French employers were deemed illegal in May 2016.

“The development of information and communication technologies, if badly managed or regulated, can have an impact on the health of workers,” Article 25 of the El Khomri law states. “Among them, the burden of work and the informational overburden, the blurring of the borders between private life and professional life, are risks associated with the usage of digital technology.”

In the U.S., Aetna has incentivized sleep for its workers. CNBC reported that Chairman and CEO Merk Bertolini will pay any employee $25 a night, for up to $500 a year, to any worker that can sleep for seven or more hours in a row. This innovative program has been tested, and it works, Bertolini says, as proven by a more alert workforce, and higher productivity.

Mr. Secretary, examples like Aetna are few and far between, however. The rest of the country has a lot of catching up to do, and precedent needs to be set at the federal level. I demand that you enact new standards that reflect this knowledge, that aim to benefit employer and employee alike by making sleep a priority.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Feb 17, 2018 MILLICENT VOLENTINE
Feb 13, 2018 Kathi Aker
Feb 13, 2018 gregory anderson
Feb 12, 2018 Martha Kubik
Feb 9, 2018 OSVALDO TOMAS
Feb 9, 2018 Barry Katz You can get more productivity out of a worker who gets more rest than working them to death with the traditional 8-5 workday short breaks and no flex hours. Reducing the work week by 1 hour per day might also help.
Feb 8, 2018 Jodi Carlin I am a retired respiratory therapist. I worked in a hospital setting for 20 years. I cannot count the double shifts that I did to where I would be working 16 hours and expected to be back less than 8 hours after I left. A common practice in most hospital
Feb 8, 2018 c. martinez
Feb 8, 2018 Tonya Stafford
Feb 8, 2018 Sheila Ward
Feb 8, 2018 Karen Kaddatz
Feb 7, 2018 Ruth Rogers
Feb 6, 2018 Andrey Yushchenko I also like to sleep for a long time.
Feb 4, 2018 Sieglinda Preez
Jan 25, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 20, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 14, 2018 Sue Ellen Lupien
Jan 7, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 7, 2018 Beth O'Brien
Jan 2, 2018 Jodi Ford
Dec 17, 2017 Karrie Vukelic
Dec 17, 2017 Jacqueline Godbout
Dec 17, 2017 Linda Longworth
Dec 15, 2017 Stacey Govito
Dec 11, 2017 A Martin
Dec 8, 2017 Cat Thomas
Dec 7, 2017 Dat Tran
Dec 7, 2017 Cindy Stein
Dec 7, 2017 Ken Stein
Nov 26, 2017 Joe and Karen Lansdale
Nov 25, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Nov 19, 2017 CINDY COLLIER
Nov 16, 2017 John Moszyk
Nov 15, 2017 Beah Robinson
Nov 13, 2017 Donna Noonan
Nov 12, 2017 DayLynn McDonald
Nov 12, 2017 Jelica Roland
Nov 10, 2017 Vianney Ventura
Nov 1, 2017 SleepyHead CENTRAL SleepyHead CENTRAL strongly supports the Right to Sleep. Research data proves the economic burden of a sleep-deprived workforce. Workers who get enough sleep will not only perform better at work, but will be healthier and have fewer dangerous accidents.
Oct 25, 2017 Kimberly Wallace
Oct 23, 2017 Richard Bosboom
Oct 15, 2017 Deborah Moore
Oct 15, 2017 Ivan Zhyvolup
Oct 15, 2017 Kim Hanke
Oct 15, 2017 L F
Oct 15, 2017 Jeffrey Bains
Oct 12, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Oct 11, 2017 David Bott
Oct 2, 2017 Anna Krohn
Oct 1, 2017 Jenifer Webb

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