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Goal: 45,000 Progress: 22,864
Sponsored by: The Veterans Site

In 2014, the VA announced the U.S. Veteran Service Dog Program which was intended to allow U.S. veterans with certified service dogs unlimited access to veterinary care.

Many veterans' groups initially cheered, but under greater scrutiny, the Program was revealed to be an incomplete, halfhearted measure.

Why? Because it doesn't cover service dogs for psychiatric conditions, including PTSD.

The VA's U.S. Veteran Service Dog Program covers the cost of service dogs only in cases of physical disability. Dogs for mobility, hearing, or sight are covered, but psychiatric issues like PTSD are not. The VA claims that there is not enough evidence to show that the dogs were efficacious despite countless studies to the contrary.

Countless studies disagree with the VA. The Use of Psychiatric Service Dogs in the Treatment of Veterans with PTSD, a study conducted by Craig Love Ph.D. in 2009 found that 82% of those with a PTSD diagnosis reported symptom reduction after partnership with a service dog, and another 40% reported that their use of medication decreased. Other studies have found PTSD service dogs can lessen a veteran's perception of physical pain, decrease agitation and aggression, increase social interaction and ability to manage daily living, lower blood pressure and heart rate, decrease loneliness, and ease anxiety or depression.

Clearly, service dogs for PTSD can be part of an effective treatment which improves the quality of veterans' lives, which is why the VA MUST cover the cost of service dogs for psychiatric conditions.

Not all wounds are visible. Tell the VA to change the U.S. Veteran Service Dog Program to cover service dogs for any troop that needs one!

Sign Here






To the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs,

I am writing as a concerned citizen to you on behalf of the thousands of veterans who find they are suffering from PTSD. I hope we can both agree that it is vital for the country to do all it can to assist struggling vets.

In 2014, the VA announced the U.S. Veteran Service Dog Program which was intended to allow U.S. veterans with certified service dogs unlimited access to veterinary care. Many veterans' groups cheered, but under greater scrutiny, the Program was revealed to be an incomplete, halfhearted measure.

Why? Because it doesn't cover service dogs for psychiatric conditions, including PTSD.

The VA claims that there is not enough evidence to show that the dogs were efficacious despite countless studies to the contrary.

Countless studies disagree with the VA. The Use of Psychiatric Service Dogs in the Treatment of Veterans with PTSD, a study conducted by Craig Love Ph.D. in 2009 found that 82% of those with a PTSD diagnosis reported symptom reduction after partnership with a service dog, and another 40% reported that their use of medication decreased. Other studies have found PTSD service dogs can lessen a veteran's perception of physical pain, decrease agitation and aggression, increase social interaction and ability to manage daily living, lower blood pressure and heart rate, decrease loneliness, and ease anxiety or depression.

Clearly, service dogs for PTSD can be part of an effective treatment which improves the quality of veterans' lives, which is why the VA MUST cover the cost of service dogs for psychiatric conditions.

Not all wounds are visible. Please, help our veterans cope with PTSD by covering their costs for service dogs. The studies that prove their effectiveness are there. The lives of thousands of veterans in need of help depend on you.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


May 24, 2018 Cassandra Johnson
May 23, 2018 amy lerner
May 22, 2018 Peggy Van Sickle
May 22, 2018 Karen Brennhofer
May 22, 2018 Aliyah Khan
May 22, 2018 Melody Modica
May 21, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 21, 2018 RENATE SCHEWCZYK
May 21, 2018 Moira Meyer
May 21, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 20, 2018 Gina Lippa
May 20, 2018 Karen Muzynski
May 19, 2018 Luis Figueroa
May 19, 2018 Donna Selquist
May 19, 2018 Teri Boots
May 19, 2018 Elaine Dunn
May 19, 2018 Denise Moore Sometimes it's the companionship of a pet that saves ones life! Include service dogs for psychiatric conditions it will save lives
May 19, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 19, 2018 Lori Harris
May 18, 2018 Jennifer Goade Please VA change the U.S Veteran service dog program to cover service dogs for any troop that needs one!!!
May 18, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 18, 2018 (Name not displayed) So, explain to me why these dogs can't be brought back and trained for vets with various disabilities, including PTSD. I bet if the head of the VA needed a dog, he'd get one before you could say, get me a dog! They have given so much, why not help them.
May 18, 2018 Barbara McCarthy Our veterans need these service dogs to help them cope with this terrible trauma they are dealing with.
May 18, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 18, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 17, 2018 Florencia Cudicio
May 17, 2018 Felicia Dale
May 17, 2018 Tiffany Brown
May 17, 2018 Laura Congdon
May 17, 2018 Winn Adams
May 17, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 16, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 16, 2018 Alana Spicer
May 16, 2018 Melenie Mah
May 16, 2018 Lisa Neste
May 16, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 16, 2018 Mena viana
May 16, 2018 Cathy Reeves I am proud to sign this petition. As a sufferer from depression and a dog owner I know the benefits of having a relationship with one of these amazing creatures. Their unconditional love is so healing and they seem to understand what humans cannot.
May 16, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 16, 2018 Carrie Mahony
May 16, 2018 jill osment
May 16, 2018 Satoko Fujita
May 16, 2018 Ingrid Cerqueni
May 16, 2018 Lindsey Dakin
May 16, 2018 (Name not displayed)
May 15, 2018 de car I Suffer from PTSD I NEED a service Dog.. i have met a couple golden Doodles my anxiety and fear very high, whole being was shaking. as soon as the presense of the dog was there it was gone.. they can save so many lives
May 15, 2018 Maria Arteaga
May 15, 2018 michelle taylor
May 15, 2018 Miriam Feehily
May 15, 2018 achim schwirtz

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